Symposium

Symposium: Law of Democracy

REGISTER HERE

Please note: Registration for most panels will remain open until the day before the conference (Thursday, February 4, 2016). We have reached capacity for the dinner keynote event with Commissioner Ravel, the continental breakfast, and the closing lunch event with Ben Ginsburg, and we will no longer be accepting registration requests for those events.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2016
12:00 pm - 1:45 pm: OPENING LUNCH
(Manning Faculty Lounge)
[Conference Participants Only]

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm: VOTING RIGHTS
(Law School Room 190)

Presentation 1: Stephen Ansolabehere, Harvard University; Nathaniel Persily, Stanford Law School; and Charles Stewart III, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Presentation 2: Rabia Belt, Stanford Law School

Presentation 3: Samuel Issacharoff, New York University School of Law

Discussants: Jane S. Schacter, Stanford Law School; Tabatha Abu El-Haj, Drexel University School of Law

 

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm: REDISTRICTING
(Law School Room 190)

Presentation 1: Guy-Uriel Charles, Duke University School of Law & Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Indiana University School of Law

Presentation 2: Edward B. Foley, The Ohio State University College of Law

Presentation 3: Sam Wang, Princeton University

Discussants: Heather Gerken, Yale Law School; Maggie McKinley, Harvard Law School

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm: DINNER AND KEYNOTE SPEECH
Ann M. Ravel, Commissioner, Federal Election Commission
(Law School Lounge)

SATURDAY,  FEBRUARY 6, 2016

8:15 am - 9:15 am: CONTENTINENTAL BREAKFAST
(Law School Lounge)

9:30 am – 11:00 am: CAMPAIGN FINANCE
(Law School Room 190)

Presentation 1: Robert Bauer, Perkins Coie

Presentation 2: Richard L. Hasen, University of California, Irvine, School of Law

Presentation 3: Bertrall Ross, University of California School of Law

Discussants: Spencer A. Overton, George Washington University Law School; Eugene Mazo, Rutgers School of Law

11:20 am - 12:50 pm: ROLE OF DONORS, LOBBYISTS, AND PARTISAN INFLUENCE
(Law School Room 190)

Presentation 1: Michael S. Kang, Emory University School of Law

Presentation 2: Maggie McKinley, Harvard Law School

Presentation 3: Richard H. Pildes, New York University School of Law

Discussants: Michael W. McConnell, Stanford Law School; Justin Weinstein-Tull, Stanford Law School

12:50 pm - 2:00 pm: LUNCH AND PRESENTATION
Benjamin L. Ginsberg, Jones Day
(Law School Lounge)

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm: VOTING RIGHTS (Law School Room 190)

Presentation 1: Stephen Ansolabehere, Harvard University

Presentation 2: Nicholas Stephanopoulos, University of Chicago Law School

Presentation 3: Justin Weinstein-Tull, Stanford Law School

Discussants: Spencer A. Overton, George Washington University Law School; Rabia Belt, Stanford Law School

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

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Past Symposia

2015 — Who Knows: Law in an Information Society
2014 — The Civil Rights Act at Fifty
2012 — The Privacy Paradox: Privacy and Its Conflicting Values
2011 — The Future of Patents: Bilski and Beyond

 
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SLR in the News

The Washington Post mentions Richard A. Sander's article A Systemic Analysis of Affirmative Action in American Law Schools.

SCOTUSBlog references Jason Zarrow and William Milliken's SLR Online article Retroactivity, the Due Process Clause, and the Federal Question in Montgomery v. Louisiana.

The Atlantic mentions Keith Cunningham's article Father Time: Flexible Work Arrangements and the Law Firm's Failure of the Family.

Justice Scalia cites Is Capital Punishment Morally Required? Acts, Omissions, and Life-Life Tradeoffs in his concurring opinion in Glossip v. Gross.

Justice Breyer cites Uses and Abuses of Empirical Evidence in the Death Penalty Debate in his dissent in Glossip v. Gross.

Justice Kagan cites Statutory Interpretation from the Inside in her dissent in Yates v. United States.

SCOTUSBlog references Mark Rienzi's SLR Online article Substantive Due Process as a Two-Way Street.

The National Journal praises Substantive Due Process as a Two-Way Street.

The Economist references The Drone as a Privacy Catalyst.

The Green Bag lauds Toby Heytens's article Reassignment as an "exemplar of good legal writing" from 2014.

The Economist mentions Urska Velikonja's forthcoming article Public Compensation for Private Harm in the cover article of its August 30 issue.

The Economist writes a column on Stephen Bainbridge's and Todd Henderson's article Boards-R-Us.

SCOTUSBlog cites Eric Hansford's Volume 63 note Measuring the Effects of Specialization with Circuit Split Resolutions in one of its Academic Highlight blog posts.

The Atlantic and The National Journal cite Jeffrey Rosen's SLR Online article The Right to Be Forgotten.

WSJ MoneyBeat writes a column about Urska Velikonja's forthcoming article Public Compensation for Private Harm.

Education Law Prof Blog discusses Joshua Weishart's article Transcending Equality Versus Adequacy.

The D.C. Circuit cites Statutory Interpretation from the Inside in Loving v. IRS (PDF).

Constitutional Law Prof Blog discusses Toby Heytens's article Reassignment.

Justice Scalia cites Beyond DOMA: Choice of State Law in Federal Statutes in his dissent in Windsor.

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